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Clyst St Mary Primary School

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Core Subjects

Maths

 

Intent  

 

  • leaders take on or construct a curriculum that is ambitious and designed to give all learners, particularly the most disadvantaged and those with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) or high needs, the knowledge and cultural capital they need to succeed in life  
  • the provider’s curriculum is coherently planned and sequenced towards cumulatively sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning and employment  
  • the provider has the same academic, technical or vocational ambitions for almost all learners. Where this is not practical – for example, for some learners with high levels of SEND – its curriculum is designed to be ambitious and to meet their needs  
  • learners study the full curriculum. Providers ensure this by teaching a full range of subjects for as long as possible, ‘specialising’ only when necessary

 

At Clyst St Mary we aim to teach children how to make sense of the world around them by developing their ability to calculate, reason and solve problems. We aim to support children in life in all curriculum areas and for their future by equipping them with a range of computational skills and the ability to solve problems in a variety of contexts by delivering a mastery curriculum.


 

Our aims in the teaching of mathematics are:

  • To promote the enjoyment of learning through practical activity, exploration and discussion
  • To develop confidence and competence with numbers and the number system
  • To develop the ability to solve problems through decision-making and reasoning in a range of contexts
  • To develop a practical understanding of the ways in which information is gathered and presented
  • To explore features of shape and space, and develop the use of measuring skills in a range of contexts
  • To help children understand the importance of mathematics in everyday life
  • To become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately 
  • To reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language

 

 

Implementation

 

  • teachers have good knowledge of the subject(s) and courses they teach. Leaders provide effective support for those teaching outside their main areas of expertise
  • teachers present subject matter clearly, promoting appropriate discussion about the subject matter they are teaching. They check learners’ understanding systematically, identify misconceptions accurately and provide clear, direct feedback. In doing so, they respond and adapt their teaching as necessary, without unnecessarily elaborate or differentiated approaches
  • over the course of study, teaching is designed to help learners to remember in the long term the content they have been taught and to integrate new knowledge into larger concepts  
  • teachers and leaders use assessment well, for example to help learners embed and use knowledge fluently or to check understanding and inform teaching. Leaders understand the limitations of assessment and do not use it in a way that creates unnecessary burdens for staff or learners  
  • teachers create an environment that allows the learner to focus on learning. The resources and materials that teachers select – in a way that does not create unnecessary workload for staff – reflect the provider’s ambitious intentions for the course of study and clearly support the intent of a coherently planned curriculum, sequenced towards cumulatively sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning and employment 

 

At our school, we teach mathematics to all children, whatever their ability or individual need. Through our quality first mathematics teaching, we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make good progress. Every child has an equal right to be taught mathematics, in daily lessons of approximately one hour. This may be shorter, approximately 45 minutes in Key Stage 1.  

 

We aim for children to master the key areas and domains of mathematics, narrowing the gap between the most and least able learners. The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress will always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly will be challenged to deepen their understanding by being offered rich and sophisticated problems and not accelerated through to new content. 

 

Mathematics is a symbolic, abstract language. To decode this language, symbols need to come alive and speak so clearly to children that it becomes as easy to understand as reading a story. We believe that all students, when introduced to a key  new concept, should have the opportunity to build competency in this topic by taking the concrete-pictorial-abstact approach.


 

Concrete – students should have the opportunity to use concrete objects and manipulatives to help them understand what they are doing.

Pictorial – students should then build on this concrete approach by using pictorial representations. These representations can then be used to reason and solve problems.

Abstract – with the foundations firmly laid, students should be able to move to an abstract approach using numbers and key concepts with confidence.

 

All classrooms have concrete resources that can be used in the teaching and learning of mathematics. These are provided for the children in earlier years but children are encouraged to be more independent in selecting resources as they progress through Key Stage. They are not just used for teaching new concepts but for children to explain and demonstrate their understanding to themselves and others. Some more topic specific resources are stored centrally.

 

We assess the children at the beginning and end of each term and this data is not only used to track progress, but also to make decisions on what to prioritise to teach in the coming term while still maintaining curriculum coverage. More informal assessments are also made by teachers before and after each topic is taught to further target those children and concepts that need more focus. Assessment in mathematics takes place daily using a range of strategies such as marking and feedback of work and verbal discussions with children. All marking in books is done with a green pen and the children are sometimes encouraged to respond where the teachers writes ‘CR’. They do this in purple pen and gradually improve the quality and quantity of their responses as they progress through KS2. In KS1, the teacher or teaching assistants write observations on notes which are stuck into books, and these include the swords children have used to respond in lessons.

 

Children are formally tracked using our tracking grids. This data is used by the Maths Subject Leader, Senior Leadership Team and Headteacher to review children against Age Related Expectations based on their Key Stage starting points. Children who are not on track are identified for intervention/target teaching by teachers and shown on their Provision Maps.

 

We know that children need to have basic number and calculation skills in order to access the many different concepts to be taught throughout both key stages, so we focus on the teaching and assessment of number bonds to 20 and times tables. These are assessed termly for Year 1 to 4 and teachers target intervention where needed. 

 

During our daily lessons we encourage children to count aloud, practise fluency, problem solving and reasoning skills and ask mathematical questions. We develop the children’s ability to represent problems using visual skills, including jottings and pictorial representations. Wherever possible, we provide meaningful contexts and encourage the children to apply their learning to everyday situations. Although mathematics is best taught discretely, it has many cross-curricular links and teachers use opportunities in other subject areas to rehearse skills in a context. Mathematics involves developing confidence and competence in number work, geometry, measures and statistics and the using and applying of these skills.

 

The Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum feeds into the National Curriculum. It is good practice to make use of cross curricular links to enable the children to use their learning in a real life context. Therefore pupils are given plenty of opportunities within sessions to use and apply mathematical skills and concepts they have learned. 

 

All classrooms will have a display area specifically for mathematics. This is called a working wall and will display items the children need to support and develop the unit’s learning. For example, key vocabulary, success criteria, models and key questions. In the EYF Stage, there will also be specific mathematical areas for children to access in their everyday learning.

 

Planning will be accessed from a range of resources to avoid following a scheme and enable more bespoke teaching by teachers based on assessments and being able to teach from children’s prior knowledge and ‘where they are’. Daily teaching will involve elements of reasoning and problem solving and aim to build resilience and purpose in the children’s learning.

 

Teachers are offered CPD where needed and teachers who are new to year groups, or to the school, are supported by the coordinator to understand the mastery and reasoning approach to teaching. 

 

The maths coordinator attends termly meetings to keep up to date with the latest developments in maths teaching and disseminates these to staff at staff meetings. The coordinator also monitors maths throughout the school termly, reviewing books, lessons, resources and by talking to the children. 

 

Clyst St Mary have been working within the Jurassic Maths Hub working collaboratively to improve understanding of how to improve the planning and teaching of reasoning in our schools and this is being passed through the school through smaller collaborative groups of staff using a plan, teach and review system. 

 

We foster a love of the subject though attending maths coding or puzzle days at other schools and entering competitions. We have a times table certificate scheme where certificates are awarded in weekly achievement assemblies and this helps to foster positivity towards maths from the children.

 

Impact 

 

  • learners develop detailed knowledge and skills across the curriculum and, as a result, achieve well. Where relevant, this is reflected in results from national tests and examinations that meet government expectations, or in the qualifications obtained  
  • learners are ready for the next stage of education, employment or training. Where relevant, they gain qualifications that allow them to go on to destinations that meet their interests, aspirations and the intention of their course of study. They read widely and often, with fluency and comprehension.

 

Pupils develop a secure understanding and confidence in maths with resilience and problem solving skills to aid learning in all subject areas. They develop a growth mindset and love of mathematics to want to study further at secondary school. Develop:

 

  • Learners who can clearly explain their reasoning and justify their thought processes using mathematical language and apply it to new problems in unfamiliar situations
  • Quick recall of facts and procedures
  • Flexibility and fluidity to move between different contexts and representations of mathematics
  • Ability to recognise relationships and make connections in mathematics
  • Happy confident, articulate and autonomous learners with a life-long passion for learning.

 

 

 

Why White Rose?

 

The reasons we chose the White Rose Maths Primary Scheme of Learning can be summarised by the following points:

 

  • It provides a powerful CPA approach (concrete, pictoral, then abstract) including in its use of models and images, which helps secure pupils understanding of mathematics and to make connections between different representations.
  • There is a great emphasis on mathematical language, questioning, explaining, reasoning and problem solving.  This allows pupils to discuss the mathematics they are doing, support each other to take ideas further, and develop a broad and secure understanding.
  • It provides a connected, progressive curriculum, aiding the development of carefully sequenced lessons, (See more below on progression within the scheme).
  • It develops the skills of teachers, without interfering with professional judgement by being over prescriptive.
  • The curriculum is designed to use skills that have already been learnt in different contexts (sometimes called ‘interleaving’) whenever possible. This helps pupils to remember and to make connections between different parts of the curriculum.
  • It combines the best of both ‘mastery’ and ‘spiral’ approaches in the curriculum. It follows many of the mastery principles – spending longer on topics to help gain deeper understanding, making connections, keeping the class working together on the same topic and a fundamental belief that, through effort, all pupils are capable of understanding, doing and improving at mathematics. But also recognising that just spending a good chunk of time on a topic doesn’t mean that all pupils will ‘master’ it the first time they see it, and that they need to see it again and again in different contexts and in different years to help them truly develop their understanding on their journey to mastery, so we’ve built in the revisiting and reinforcing features of spiral curricula too.
  • It is a curriculum that is ambitious and that works for all, with everybody studying the same topic and being provided with support and challenge as needed. Many of the teaching strategies we advocate for all pupils are particularly useful for pupils with SEND. See more on how the scheme supports those with SEND below

Primary National Curriculum - Mathematics

Clyst St Mary Primary School Calculation Policy

We aim to provide all pupils with some direct teaching every day, which is oral, interactive and stimulating. Teaching styles and lesson structure provide opportunities for pupils to consolidate their previous learning, use and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills, pose and ask questions, investigate mathematical ideas, reflect on their own learning and make links with other work.

 

Our approach to teaching is based on some key principles:

 

• a dedicated mathematics’ lessons every day;

• direct teaching and interactive oral work;

• an emphasis on mental calculation;

• activities differentiated in a manageable way so that all pupils are engaged in mathematics related to a common theme

• Opportunities for investigation

The Classrooms are stimulating learning environments. Displays contain a mixture of:

• problems to stimulate imagination;

• prompts to help pupils develop an image of number and the number system (for example number squares and number lines) and to help them remember key facts and vocabulary;

• pupils’ work which celebrates achievement.

Children are assessed in a variety of ways:

• short, informal tests focusing on rapid recall of mental calculation skills

• homework and other informal tests (which are often followed immediately by marking and discussion with the whole class).

 

Assessment activities are planned which involve a range of ideas and skills linked to one or more of the key objectives covered previously. As a result of these assessments, individual targets are discussed with pupils. These targets are related to the list of key objectives. Parents are kept informed about these through Parent Evenings.

 

Long-term assessments are undertaken through a combination of teacher assessment and end of year tests. The tests used are the national tests at the end of Year 2 and 6 and class based assessments are used in other year groups. 

 

 

English 

Primary National Curriculum - English

The English Curriculum is delivered using the National Curriculum guidance 2014, and the Foundation Stage is followed to ensure continuity and progression.

 

SPEAKING AND LISTENING

The Four Strands of Speaking and Listening: Speaking; Listening; Group Discussion and Interaction, and Drama permeate the whole curriculum. Interactive teaching strategies are used to engage all pupils in order to raise reading and writing standards. Children are encouraged to develop effective communication skills in readiness for later life.

 

READING

Our approach to reading at Clyst St Mary Primary School is to develop fluency, comprehension and a love of reading. Individual reading at school, together with guided reading groups, both teaches and assesses reading and the Benchmark book banding assessment tool enables judgements about reading ability and progression. The coloured book banding scheme is followed until children are competent and fluent readers when ‘free reading’ choices enables the development of individual reading preferences and breadth of understanding.

 

Phonics: We follow the Read Write Inc. phonics programme for our children in Reception to Year 2 and for our children in Years 3 and 4 who additional support. It is a comprehensive literacy programme, weaving decoding, comprehension, writing and spelling together seamlessly. The children are taught in small groups everyday and one to one coaching is provided to children where additional phonics interventions are required. 

 

APPROACHES TO READING

The opportunities, organisation and provision for the teaching and learning of reading are as follows:

 

• Shared reading: Children in Classes R, One and Two take part in individual and group reading at least once a week.

• Guided reading: All children in all classes are grouped in ability and take part in a daily guided reading sessions.

• Independent reading: In classes R, One and Two children have a book sharing session each day. Children in key stage two read independently at least three times a week.

• Resources – A book banded reading scheme operates across the school which comprises of a range of different schemes. Children work their way through the key stage one and two schemes and then become free readers.

• Links to parents – Each child has a reading record book which logs books they have read and comments about their reading. Parents and teaching staff write in this book.

• Class books: Stories are read to the children on a daily basis throughout the school. In key stage two classes this takes the form of a class novel.

• Reading at home: Children are encouraged to read at home every day – this is given high priority.

 

In Classes R, One and Two reading is assessed every half term using the RWI assessments. In classes 3, 4 & 5 NFER reading tests are used termly to look at children's progress in classes 3, 4 and 5 and Class 6 use past SATs paper.

 

WRITING

Opportunities, organisation and provision for the teaching and learning of writing are as follows:

 

• Phonics and spelling: We follow the Read Write Inc. phonics programme for our children in Reception to Year 2 and for our children in Years 3 and 4 who need extra phonics practise. Read Write Inc. is a comprehensive literacy programme, weaving decoding, comprehension, writing and spelling together seamlessly. The children are taught in small groups everyday and one to one coaching is provided to children where additional phonics interventions are required. 

• Emergent writing: In Reception and Key Stage One children are given daily opportunities to write freely within a particular genre and across the curriculum. This gives them the opportunity to become emergent writers.

• Shared Writing : Within each teaching sequences shared writing is a key activity.

• Guided Writing/Independent Writing: Each teaching sequence ends with an opportunity for guided and independent writing. There are also frequent opportunities for independent writing throughout the other curriculum areas.

• Extended writing: Throughout the term there are opportunities for extended writing. On a termly basis samples of these extended writing outcomes are used for assessment purposes.

• Special Writing Books: Children keep samples of their best written work in their own Special Writing Book. The work is annotated to show how much support a child has been given. Each term two pieces of work are put in the book. This book shows progress throughout their time at Clyst St Mary.

• Handwriting: We use the Letterjoin scheme to teach handwriting. Children have twice weekly lessons in Key Stage One and weekly sessions in key stage two . All children in reception and key stage one learn to write with a pencil. In key stage two classes children are given a pen licence when they are able to join fluently.

• Spelling: Children from Years 1 to 6 are given lists of spellings each week to learn at home. 

 

Work is marked and assessed against specific criteria in line with the marking and assessment policies and twice yearly meetings involve teachers moderating the assessment of this work. Samples of work at the various levels are kept in the moderation file.

 

 

 

Science

 

Intent  

 

  • leaders take on or construct a curriculum that is ambitious and designed to give all learners, particularly the most disadvantaged and those with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) or high needs, the knowledge and cultural capital they need to succeed in life  
  • the provider’s curriculum is coherently planned and sequenced towards cumulatively sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning and employment  
  • the provider has the same academic, technical or vocational ambitions for almost all learners. Where this is not practical – for example, for some learners with high levels of SEND – its curriculum is designed to be ambitious and to meet their needs  
  • learners study the full curriculum. Providers ensure this by teaching a full range of subjects for as long as possible, ‘specialising’ only when necessary

 

Example:

We aim to give the children the knowledge and secure foundation to develop critical and creative thought. We aim to engage pupils’ curiosity about phenomena and events in the world around them. Science links direct practical experience with ideas, it can engage learners at many levels. Scientific method is about developing and evaluating explanations through experimental evidence and modelling. Through science, pupils understand how major scientific ideas contribute to technological change – impacting on industry, business and medicine and improving the quality of life. Pupils will recognise the cultural significance of science and trace its world-wide development. They will learn to question and discuss science-based issues that may affect their own lives, the direction of society and the future of the world.

 

Implementation

 

  • teachers have good knowledge of the subject(s) and courses they teach. Leaders provide effective support for those teaching outside their main areas of expertise
  • teachers present subject matter clearly, promoting appropriate discussion about the subject matter they are teaching. They check learners’ understanding systematically, identify misconceptions accurately and provide clear, direct feedback. In doing so, they respond and adapt their teaching as necessary, without unnecessarily elaborate or differentiated approaches
  • over the course of study, teaching is designed to help learners to remember in the long term the content they have been taught and to integrate new knowledge into larger concepts  
  • teachers and leaders use assessment well, for example to help learners embed and use knowledge fluently or to check understanding and inform teaching. Leaders understand the limitations of assessment and do not use it in a way that creates unnecessary burdens for staff or learners  
  • teachers create an environment that allows the learner to focus on learning. The resources and materials that teachers select – in a way that does not create unnecessary workload for staff – reflect the provider’s ambitious intentions for the course of study and clearly support the intent of a coherently planned curriculum, sequenced towards cumulatively sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning and employment  
  • a rigorous approach to the teaching of reading develops learners’ confidence and enjoyment in reading. At the early stages of learning to read, reading materials are closely matched to learners’ phonics knowledge 

 

 

Example:

Science is taught within our cross-curricular topic structure but the progression is carefully planned so children revisit concepts throughout their time at school. We encourage our pupils to be curious about natural phenomena and to be excited by the process of understanding the world around them. Key scientific terminology will be introduced each lesson and knowledge will be built upon throughout the school. Pupils will be encouraged to work scientifically and will able to carry out simple tests and experiments using equipment and to gather and record data. The children will learn about plants, animals including humans, materials, seasonal change, habitats, rocks, light, forces, states of matter, sound, electricity, earth and space and evolution and inheritance. Activities develop the skills of enquiry, observation, locating sources of information, selecting appropriate equipment and using it safely, measuring and checking results, and making comparisons and communicating results and findings. Lessons make effective links with other curriculum areas and subjects

 

At Key Stage 1 pupils observe, explore and ask questions about living things, materials and physical phenomena. They begin to work together to collect evidence to help them answer questions and to link this to simple scientific ideas. They begin to evaluate evidence and consider whether tests or comparisons are fair. They use reference materials to find out more about scientific ideas. They share ideas and communicate them using scientific language, drawings, charts and tables with the help of ICT if it is appropriate.

 

At Key Stage 2 pupils learn about a wider range of living things, materials and physical phenomena. They make links between ideas and explain things using simple models and theories. They apply their knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas to familiar phenomena, everyday things and their personal health. They think about the effects of scientific and technological developments on the environment and in other contexts. They carry out more systematic investigations, working on their own and with others. They use a range of reference sources in their work. They talk about their work and its significance, using a wide range of scientific language, conventional diagrams, charts, graphs and ICT to communicate their ideas.

Impact 

 

  • learners develop detailed knowledge and skills across the curriculum and, as a result, achieve well. Where relevant, this is reflected in results from national tests and examinations that meet government expectations, or in the qualifications obtained  
  • learners are ready for the next stage of education, employment or training. Where relevant, they gain qualifications that allow them to go on to destinations that meet their interests, aspirations and the intention of their course of study. They read widely and often, with fluency and comprehension.

 

Example:

The successful approach at Clyst St Mary Primary School results in a fun, engaging, high-quality science education, that provides children with the foundations and knowledge for understanding the world. Our engagement with the local environment ensures that children learn through varied and first hand experiences of the world around them. Frequent, continuous and progressive learning outside the classroom is embedded throughout the science curriculum. Through various workshops, trips and interactions with experts and local charities, children have the understanding that science has changed our lives and that it is vital to the world’s future prosperity. Children learn the possibilities for careers in science, as a result of our community links and connection with national agencies such as the STEM association. Children at Clyst St Mary Primary School enjoy science and this results in motivated learners with sound scientific understanding.

 

Primary National Curriculum - Science

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